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New York Construction Law

Category Archives: Labor & Employment in Construction

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Travel Time: To Pay or Not to Pay

Posted in Labor & Employment in Construction

Do I have to pay my workers for travel time when I provide transportation to a job site?

Slate Rock and Gravel, Inc. has a reputation for completing jobs on time and under budget. For their convenience, employees often report to the yard at 5:15 a.m. and then travel to the construction site in company trucks loaded with tools.  They … Continue Reading

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Did the Union Cross the (Picket) Line?

Posted in Labor & Employment in Construction

When I arrived home last night, there were picketers in my front yard carrying signs saying “Shame on Johnny!  He doesn’t pay union wages!”  This morning, the picketers have set up shop on the sidewalk outside our construction yard.  Now, they have signs telling my employees and customers that I am “Cheating the American Worker.”  Can I make them stop Continue Reading

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2017 Minimum Wage Hike: What You Need To Know

Posted in Labor & Employment in Construction

Effective December 31, 2016, New York no longer has a state wide minimum wage. In 2017, the minimum wage is based on where employees work. Also, in New York City rates depend on the number of people you employ.

WORK LOCATION MINIMUM WAGE New York City (11 or more employees) $11.00 New York City (1-10 employees) $10.50 Nassau, Suffolk, and… Continue ReadingContinue Reading

Effective January 22, 2017: NEW I-9 Forms

Posted in Labor & Employment in Construction

Employers are required to prepare and retain I-9 Forms for employees. The purpose – to verify an employee’s identity and authorization to work in the United States.  The New I-9 Forms should make them easier to complete and minimize mistakes that often result in significant monetary penalties.

The biggest change – the new forms can be completed electronically. Embedded question … Continue Reading

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The U.S. Government’s Recent Crackdown on Employer Misclassifications of Workers: What it Means for New York Construction

Posted in Labor & Employment in Construction

Currently, many employers throughout the U.S. Economy classify workers as “1099” independent contractors to reduce labor costs. By classifying a worker as an “independent contractor” instead of as an employee, employers avoid having to pay payroll taxes, the expenses associated with workers’ compensation and unemployment, employee benefits, and the time and money associated with administering and complying with various … Continue Reading

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